Build a Blended Learning Repository

Blended Learning repository
Build a library of resources that teachers can easily access, review and modify for their own use.

You’ve got a growing library of e-learning assets, things you’ve spent countless hours creating. So where do you keep these? Locked in your computer? What are they doing there?! Set your resources free.

Build a repository to showcase your work to those who will appreciate and get inspired by it. Better yet, allow people you select to download and use these items. Blended Learning is meant to be reusable, so save yourself time by putting them where they’re easily accessible.

We often hear that many people still don’t know exactly what blended learning “is”. Some may even feel intimidated by blended learning, thinking it could somehow “replace” them. By letting educators browse current and past projects they can start to understand how useful blended learning really is. And it’s easier than starting from scratch! Many times browsing our projects can inspire new ideas. Once educators see how others use blended learning they can begin to see the value for themselves.

We can build a library of topics and other useful resources that educators can easily access, review and in some cases modify for their own use. New or existing resources can also be created or converted. Your repository doesn’t have to be limited to e-learning; if you’ve purchased stock photos or videos that are licensed to your faculty include links to those, too. And remember, you’re not limited to only your resources. Provide links with helpful tips to your favorite Open Educational Resources (OERs).

You’ll most likely want your repository to be accessed only by people you designate, so it should either reside on your intranet or be private (invitation only).

Here are some ideas for filling your repository:

Ideas: Have an ideas section to get them thinking about using blended learning in their course. Some examples could be activities they can use in class, how to use peer review, how to do a lecture check, etc.

Case Studies: Create some use case examples of how others are using blended learning, whether in your faculty or others.

Animations: If you’ve created animations, showcase them so they can see what they can use in their lecture presentations, assignments and tests.

Apps: Are you fond of certain apps? Let people know what the best ones are (or which ones should be avoided).

Classroom Activities: Blended learning isn’t just online. Describe some interactive activities teachers can use during class time.

Games: Provide examples or links to game-based interactions that include instant rewards, clear feedback, and challenging goals.

Graphics: You’ve certainly amassed a large folder or two with useful graphics. Share illustrations and photographs that instructors can use in their lectures, assignments and tests.

Interactions: Show examples of how to engage students through online learning activities.

Mobile: Students want to be able to access blended learning on their devices. If you’ve designed responsive blended learning activities, put them here.

Presentations: Do you have lectures or interviews (your academics’ or others) that you can upload for reusable flipped learning?

Self-Assessment: Upload your self-contained quizzes and activities to help teachers encourage students to self-assess online.

Social: Show the benefits of collaboration through online learning communities or crowdsourced projects.

Topics: Stick your self-contained, portable microlearning objects here.

Videos: Store your collection of videos or video links from YouTube, Vimeo, HHMI or other learning sites here for easy reference.

Blend: Online

So now you can begin to see how really useful having a Blended Learning Repository can be! Do you have some useful ideas for a repository? Share your ideas below.

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